NOT YOUR GRANDMA’S STOCKINGS

by | May 3, 2021 | Blog

This article first appeared in the November 3rd edition of Mimi Vanderhaven Magazine

By Dr. Sonja Stiller, Center for Advanced Vein Care

One of the best ways to avoid the complications of venous disease is to wear compression stockings. Wait—before you turn the page, I’m not talking about grandma stockings. Today’s designer hosiery are colorful, trendy and effective. In fact, knowing that I cannot avoid aging, gravity or genetic predisposition, I wear compression stockings myself as a preventive measure. Last year I purchased a green pair and a candy apple red pair and wore them to holiday parties.

No one has to know.

But compression stockings are not always optional. Most insurance companies have a six-week compression stocking requirement before approving a treatment. That means autumn is a great time to get started because it isn’t 90 degrees outside.

In addition, I recommend compression stockings for women who are pregnant. Pregnancy is a risk factor for venous disease because the body contains 50% more blood volume during the last trimester. Actually, I encourage everyone to wear compression stockings, especially if you do a lot of standing or walking.

Although you can buy stockings with 20-30mmHg (a measurement of pressure) over the counter without a prescription, it’s best to be properly fitted by a medical supply company or at a physicians office like ours. Not all ankles, calves and thighs are the same size, so proper fit is essential.

Please consult a vein specialist now if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Chronic leg pain
  • Fatigue (don’t want to walk upstairs)
  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS)
  • Leg cramps
  • Swelling
  • Blood clots

Dr. Sonja Stiller is a diplomat of both the American Board of Emergency Medicine and the American Board of Venous and Lymphatic Medicine and is the founder of the Center for Advanced Vein Care located at 7200 Mentor Avenue, in Mentor. For an appointment, call 440-710-1140. More information can be found at YourHealthyVeins.com.